MEMORY IMPROVEMENT

Hypnosis can help you improve your memory, pass written or oral tests/exams, and enjoy studying and homework.

Hypnosis can improve all aspects of learning and memory: Registering, Retaining, and Retrieving, while at the same time, it will release any learning blocks, and create valuable new study habits. You will learn how to access information when you need it, with reduced stress and anxiety.

In addition, no matter how smart you are, whether you wish to do well in an exam, or in a presentation at work, hypnosis will help you to create a state of relaxed confidence that will greatly improve your performance.

The power of hypnosis is ultimately in the workings of the human mind. Trance allows deeper access to parts of the subconscious or unconscious mind that are normally outside our ordinary wakeful consciousness.

It is a well-known fact that some memories, which are thought to have been forgotten and therefore inaccessible in the waking conscious state, can be recalled during hypnosis.

Memory recall with hypnosis can be rewarding. It can help you locate a lost item.

Memory is the process of retaining information in the mind, and retrieving information from the mind that has already been stored there. In order to easily learn and use information, a good memory is crucial.

You should know that your subconscious mind has recorded everything that you experience, whether this is a past event, or information that has come to your attention.

Hypnosis can enable you to have better access to all the information held within your subconscious memory, for example, educational material, names and addresses, any numbers such as those within addresses and phone numbers, you may wish to recall more easily.

MEMORY LOSS / AMNESIA

Memory loss, also referred to as amnesia, is an abnormal degree of forgetfulness and/or inability to recall past events.

Depending on the cause, memory loss may have either a sudden or gradual onset, and memory loss may be permanent or temporary.

Memory loss may be limited to the inability to recall recent events, events from the distant past, or a combination of both.

Although the normal aging process can result in difficulty in learning and retaining new material, normal aging itself is not a cause of significant memory loss unless there is accompanying disease that is responsible for the memory loss.

Transient global amnesia is a rare, temporary, complete loss of all memory. Anterograde amnesia refers to the inability to remember recent events in the aftermath of a trauma, but recollection of events in the distant past in unaltered. Retrograde amnesia is the inability to remember events preceding a trauma, but recall of events afterward is possible.

Memory loss has multiple causes including a number of chronic medical and psychological conditions, trauma, medications, drug or alcohol abuse, and infections.

Causes of Memory Loss

Medications
Malnutrition
Head Trauma
Thyroid Disease
Cerebrovascular Disease
Mild Cognitive Impairment
Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome
Psychological/Emotional Disturbances
Neurodegenerative Diseases
Prolonged Toxin Exposure
Vitamin Deficiencies
Lewy Body Disease
Wilson’s Disease
Sleep Disorders
Neurosyphilis
Medications

A number of prescription and over-the-counter medications can interfere with or cause loss of memory. Possible culprits include: antidepressants, antihistamines, anti-anxiety medications, muscle relaxants, tranquilizers, sleeping pills, and pain medications given after surgery.

Alcohol, tobacco, or drug use

Excessive alcohol use has long been recognized as a cause of memory loss. Smoking harms memory by reducing the amount of oxygen that gets to the brain. Studies have shown that people who smoke find it more difficult to put faces with names than do nonsmokers. Illicit drugs can change chemicals in the brain that can make it hard to recall memories.

Sleep deprivation

Both quantity and quality of sleep are important to memory. Getting too little sleep or waking frequently in the night can lead to fatigue, which interferes with the ability to consolidate and retrieve information.

Depression and stress

Being depressed can make it difficult to pay attention and focus, which can affect memory. Stress and anxiety can also get in the way of concentration. When you are tense and your mind is over stimulated or distracted, your ability to remember can suffer. Stress caused by an emotional trauma can also lead to memory loss.

Nutritional deficiency

Good nutrition, including high-quality proteins and fats is important to proper brain function. Deficiencies in vitamin B1 and B12 specifically can affect memory.

Head injury

A severe hit to the head from a fall or automobile accident, for example can injure the brain and cause both short- and long-term memory loss. Memory may gradually improve over time.

Stroke

A stroke occurs when the blood supply to the brain is stopped due to the blockage of a blood vessel to the brain or leakage of a vessel into the brain. Strokes often cause short-term memory loss. A person who has had a stroke may have vivid memories of childhood events but be unable to recall what he or she had for lunch.

Dementia

Dementia is the name for progressive loss of memory and other aspects of thinking that are severe enough to interfere with the ability to function in daily activities. Although there are many causes of dementia including blood vessel disease, drug or alcohol abuse, or other causes of damage to the brain the most common and familiar is Alzheimer’s disease. Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by a progressive loss of brain cells and other irregularities of the brain.

Other causes

Other possible causes of memory loss include an under active or overactive thyroid gland and infections such as HIV, tuberculosis, and syphilis that affect the brain.

A strong memory depends on the health and vitality of your brain. Whether you’re a student studying for final exams, a working professional interested in doing all you can to stay mentally sharp, or a senior looking to preserve and enhance your gray matter as you age, there are lots of things you can do to improve your memory and mental performance.

Some memory improving tips

Don’t skimp on exercise or sleep. Just as an athlete relies on sleep and a nutrition-packed diet to perform his or her best, your ability to remember increases when you nurture your brain with a good diet and other healthy habits. When you exercise the body, you exercise the brain.

Treating your body well can enhance your ability to process and recall information. Physical exercise increases oxygen to your brain and reduces the risk for disorders that lead to memory loss, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Exercise may also enhance the effects of helpful brain chemicals and protect brain cells.

When you’re sleep deprived, your brain can’t operate at full capacity. Creativity, problem-solving abilities, and critical thinking skills are compromised. Whether you’re studying, working, or trying to juggle life’s many demands, sleep deprivation is a recipe for disaster.

Make time for friends and fun. When we think of ways to improve memory, we think of “serious” activities. But countless studies show that a life that’s full of friends and fun comes with cognitive benefits. Healthy relationships are the ultimate memory boosters. Humans are highly social animals. We’re not meant to survive, let alone thrive, in isolation. Relationships stimulate our brains. In fact, interacting with others may be the best kind of brain exercise.

Research shows that having meaningful relationships and a strong support system are vital not only to emotional health, but also to brain health. In one recent study from the Harvard School of Public Health, for example, researchers found that people with the most active social lives had the slowest rate of memory decline.

There are many ways to start taking advantage of the brain and memory-boosting benefits of socializing. Volunteer, join a club, see friends more often, or reach out over the phone.

And if a human isn’t handy, don’t overlook the value of a pet especially a highly-social dog or a cuddly cat.

Laughter is good for your brain. You’ve heard that laughter is the best medicine, and that holds true for the brain as well as the body. Unlike emotional responses, which are limited to specific areas of the brain, laughter engages multiple regions across the whole brain.

Furthermore, listening to jokes and working out punch lines activates areas of the brain vital to learning and creativity.

Spend time with fun, playful people. These are people who laugh easily, both at themselves and at life’s absurdities and who routinely find the humor in everyday events.

Their playful point of view and laughter are contagious.

Keep stress in check. Stress is one of the brain’s worst enemies. Over time, if left unchecked, chronic stress destroys brain cells and damages the hippocampus, the region of the brain involved in the formation of new memories and the retrieval of old ones.

Depression and anxiety can also affect memory. In addition to stress, depression, anxiety, and chronic worrying can also take a heavy toll on the brain. In fact, some of the symptoms of depression and anxiety include difficulty concentrating, making decisions, and remembering things. If you are mentally sluggish because of depression or anxiety, dealing with the problem will make a big difference in your cognitive abilities, including memory.

Eat a brain-boosting diet. Just as the body needs fuel, so does the brain. You probably already know that a diet based on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, “healthy” fats (such as olive oil, nuts, fish) and lean protein will provide lots of health benefits, but such a diet can also improve memory. But for brain health, it’s not just what you eat, it’s also what you don’t eat.

The following nutritional tips will help boost your brainpower and reduce your risk of dementia

Get your omega-3s. More and more evidence indicates that omega-3 fatty acids are particularly beneficial for brain health. Fish is a particularly rich source of omega-3, especially cold water “fatty fish” such as salmon, tuna, halibut, trout, mackerel, sardines, and herring. In addition to boosting brainpower, eating fish may also lower your risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

If you’re not a fan of seafood, consider non-fish sources of omega-3s such as walnuts, ground flaxseed, flax seed oil, winter squash, kidney and pinto beans, spinach, broccoli, pumpkin seeds, and soybeans.

Limit calories and saturated fat. Research shows that diets high in saturated fat (from sources such as red meat, whole milk, butter, cheese, sour cream, and ice cream) increase your risk of dementia and impair concentration and memory.

Eating too many calories in later life can also increase your risk of cognitive impairment. Talk to your doctor or dietician about developing a healthy eating plan.

Eat more fruit and vegetables. Produce is packed with antioxidants, substances that protect your brain cells from damage. Colorful fruits and vegetables are particularly good antioxidant “super food” sources. Try leafy green vegetables such as spinach, broccoli, romaine lettuce, Swiss chard, and arugula, and fruit such as bananas, apricots, mangoes, cantaloupe, and watermelon.

Drink green tea. Green tea contains polyphenols, powerful antioxidants that protect against free radicals that can damage brain cells. Among many other benefits, regular consumption of green tea may enhance memory and mental alertness and slow brain aging.

Drink wine (or grape juice) in moderation. Keeping your alcohol consumption in check is key, since alcohol kills brain cells. But in moderation (around 1 glass a day for women; 2 for men), alcohol may actually improve memory and cognition. Red wine appears to be the best option, as it is rich in resveratrol, a flavonoid that boosts blood flow in the brain and reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Other resveratrol-packed options include grape juice, cranberry juice, fresh grapes and berries, and peanuts.

For mental energy, choose complex carbohydrates. Just as a race car needs gas, your brain needs fuel to perform at its best. When you need to be at the top of your mental game, carbohydrates can keep you going. But the type of carbs you choose makes all the difference. Carbohydrates fuel your brain, but simple carbs (sugar, white bread, refined grains) give a quick boost followed by an equally rapid crash.

There is also evidence to suggest that diets high in simple carbs can greatly increase the risk for cognitive impairment in older adults. For healthy energy that lasts, choose complex carbohydrates such as whole-wheat bread, brown rice, oatmeal, high-fiber cereal, lentils, and whole beans. Avoid processed foods and limit starches (potato, pasta, rice) to no more than one quarter of your plate.

If you still need help, hypnotherapy can help you improve your memory!

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